It begins with the cliffs of Marpi

A shameless piece of self-promotion here, but my copy of Rain and Thunder arrived in the post today featuring an article I first wrote for The Radical Hub. It’s the first copy I’ve ever read and as I perused it I was delighted to come across an interview with the Japanese feminist activist Suzuyo Takazoto. Let’s talk about the subject of her activism, which is the women of Okinawa.

She doesn’t mention the beginnings in the interview, but I know that it begins with the cliffs of Marpi. When the US soldiers approached the island of Okinawa in their boats, they were confronted by the sight of hundreds of women and children throwing themselves off the cliffs of Marpi, like dodos. Japanese mothers held their chlidren in their arms and jumped, or threw their children off the cliffs first before jumping after them.

They did this, because they had been informed by their own men, the Japanese military, that it was better to die than be raped by the enemy, and possibly killed anyway. When Okinawan women learned that with the destruction of Hiroshima and Nagasaki their island would now be invaded, hundreds of women peasants made the pilgrimage to the cliffs of Marpi to take their fate into their own hands.

Western history books report that what happened was irrational, that the women’s minds were brainwashed by Japanese propaganda. But, as Suzuyo Takazoto is brave enough to teach, the women might not have been so stupid, and they might not have been blindly following orders in the way that the history books record.

In her interview Takazato mentions an incident in1993, whereby it became public knowledge all over Japan that US soldiers in Okinawa are immune to prosecution from rape, and that they frequently take advantage of this privilege. It was not actually until the rape of a 12 year old by a US soldier in 1995 that the Okinawans were finally out on the streets in order to put pressure on the Japanese government to intervene this time. As far as understand it not much has changed, because since I have been living in Japan I have seen more than a few incidents of American soldiers using their get out of jail free card. 

We can also see how ineffective the Japanese government is when it does intervene on behalf of women. It has “intervened” once before, by creating hundreds of brothels in an attempt to stop “ordinary” women from being raped. Because we all know prostitutes can’t be raped.

 Here is a small extract from the interview:

R & T: Would you talk about the historical presence of the US military in Okinawa and the culture of violence it consequently created there, particularly for women?

Extract:

Our lives were completely affected. The first thing was that very rich land was taken by force–by gunpoint. They barricaded areas. After the war ended, those who survived the war were held in concentration camps in Okinawa where they had to stay for 6 months to one year. When people were allowed to return to their own houses, they couldn’t reach their houses because there was an iron fence constructed. Many peoples’ lands were taken for the military use and that’s remained the case. After the reversion back to Japan, the Japanese government now had to pay lease money. The Okinawan people’s land had been taken. WIthin this context, almost 80% of our infrastructure had been destroyed.

When the troops stayed what happened to women? The raping of women became another new war. So for women in Okinawa, the war ended, the sound of bullets was silent, but the new war against women and our bodies started. Women from the 9-month old to the 60-year-old were raped. Some were kidnapped and then raped by groups of soldiers by gun or knifepoint. This happened right after the war until the Korean War. When the Korean War started in June 1950, Okinawa had become the deploying military base. When the troops were deployed and came back to Okinawa, they would become so brutal. They would go to local areas and rape women. All the leaders of the community were so fearful from the beginning of the 1950s, they started to set up brothels to try to stop the violence from going from the bases to the community. People in Okinawa were aware of such violence from the beginning. They knew what the effect of the U.S military was. But to avoid this violence, the leaders discussed how to set up brothels. They wanted to have some kind of prostitution area to protect “ordinary” women from the violence. But they didn’t see that it was all violence against women.”

Reading her last line again, it strikes me now that it’s possible that the Japanese community leaders may have understood that prostitution was also violence against women. The word “fearful” stands out. Since when have male leaders ever been fearful of the fact that women were being raped? I almost get the feeling they were fearful for themselves not knowing whether or not the U.S military would take it upon themselves to expand their repertoire and start raping men, or at least beating up men too. This seems a much more likely explanation for all the “fear” behind the rush to set up brothels (including the fact that the brothel owners would have been men).

 Suzuyo Takazoto continues her tireless campaigning on behalf of the women of Okinawa. You can see her speaking (in excellent English) here:

http://moananui2011.org/?page_id=854

Advertisements

10 thoughts on “It begins with the cliffs of Marpi

  1. What the women did on the cliffs of Marpi seems logical, and a last act of sovereignty over their bodies. We only have to ask the women of the Congo, or Bosnia, or any other war-torn or occupied countries what happens to women and girls in times of civil unrest and war. The soldiers (and male civilians) go a-raping, en masse. Hell, the US military are partial to raping their own female military co-workers and support staff.

    So yes, I would rather throw myself off a cliff than suffer the fairly inevitable multiple and brutal rapes by occupying forces. I cannot believe that the Japanese government allowed US soldiers immune from rape prosecutions – that is beyond belief. It is almost like they are offering up their ‘own’ females as sacrifice to get along better with the occupying forces – how else could it be interpreted? And no, an abundance of brothels usually has the opposite effect, rather than curtail male violence and rape, it increases it among the general female population.

    All in all, Japanese men threw Japanese women under the bus.

    • I agree Davina. Their actions make perfect sense.

      It’s interesting , but I’m re-reading Sexual politics right now and just got to a footnote where Millett mentions the behaviour of the Geisha’s during the second world war. Millett reckons that in times of war women gravitate to the enemy, perhaps not just as a way of mitigating the harms to themselves, but also as a way of sticking the Vs up at their own men.
      And I guess it can be compared to the fact that there are a lot more American man/Japanese woman marriages than vice versa (well it’s also partly to do with how Asian men are portrayed as feminine and weak in Hollywood as well, just as black men portrayed as hyper-masculine, primal and animalistic, while white men are portrayed as “just right”.) BUt the motivation of Japanese women interests me. They’re still sleeping with the enemy, so to speak. ANd it’s not for economic reasons because Japan is a pretty wealthy nation, and I know a few American guys here who are being supported by their wives’ families.

      I have to laugh every time I watch a white guys dreams of a little-passive-lotus-blossom-oriental-subserviant asian bride drop around his ankles. Someone tell these guys all women are the same i.e human. Tee hee.

    • The Japanese gove doesn’t really have much say, in the sense that if the rapes happen on U.S military land i.e occupied land, then Japanese law doesn’t apply, and it doesn’t matter what the Japanese want to do.
      Obviously the Japanese gove is not too happy about all of this, not because women are being hurt, but because their masculinity is being trampled on.

  2. Wow I’m in AP us history and just learned about the war and bombing of Japan. How interesting this wasn’t in the lecture… Of course America’s oh so great army wouldn’t do that!!!111!!! You know besides destroying the cities and 80,000 people along with them.

  3. i just saw something about this on TV not too long ago, and i agree that what the women did was completely reasonable. and yes, it was portrayed exactly as you say here: as if the women were wrong to do it, that they had misinterpreted what was happening (thats always the case isnt it?) and that they had been led to believe something that wasnt real, or likely to happen. when all women know better. its so completely predictable that women will be told that they are interpreting the situation wrong, and that history remembers this as one giant pooch-screw that didnt have to happen if women just understood reality better. whats at least as disturbing to me is that this kind of thing doesnt happen MORE. WHY doesnt it happen more, is a question thats very interesting to me.

    • Yes, that thought crossed my mind FCM. WHy doesn’t this happen more often!! I heard that it used to in the past, that in Europe young women who were journeying to marry a man they’d never met would commit suicide by jumping out of the carriage etc. Don’t hear much of this anymore. I think it’s because the media has brainwashed women into accepting it all.

    • when all women know better

      Yes indeed, I think that most women really do know what will happen to them in ‘war time’. Yet they seem to be in denial about their ‘own’ men for non-wartime. The war against women is really the silent war, about which no one really speaks.

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s